Sep 22, 2017 Last Updated 11:49 PM, Sep 19, 2017

Science and services for responding to a Changing climate in the Pacific

Rosy Mitiepo of the Niue Meteorological Service checks readings for the day. Rosy Mitiepo of the Niue Meteorological Service checks readings for the day. Photo: Supplied
Published in 2017 August
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SMALL island developing states are among the most vulnerable to our changing climate. People living in the Pacific are already experiencing higher temperatures, shifts in rainfall patterns, rising sea levels and changes in frequency and intensity of extreme climate events.

Further changes are expected long into the future because of climate change associated with human activity. These changes, which are occurring on top of a naturally variable climate, have far-reaching consequences that will affect communities and the environment.

Preparing for these consequences is a challenge, because climate change means that the climate we have been used to in the past is not the climate that we will have in the future. While we do not know exactly how the future will unfold in 30, 50 or 100 years, we can use climate change science to tell us what the future climate might be like.

Climate change scientists draw on what they know about how the climate system works and how it is changing to narrow down the possibilities for the climate we can expect in the future. This science-based climate change information can be used to prepare for future threats and take advantage of possible opportunities resulting from the changing climate.

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